Camera history – interesting and fascinating

So I’m still stuck in the facts about cameras and everything there is to know about them. I’ve now come to the history, since I got a bit curious about how the camera really works and how it came to be the cameras we know today.

I got into Wikipedia again, and I started to read about the history. I wanted to see how the evolution went and how the cameras got better and better. Maybe I’ll get a hint of how it will look in the future. However, this is some things I’ve learnt that I thought you might be interested in as well.

Old cameras, but not the oldest ones

The first camera ever was called the Camera Obscura, which means “dark room” in Latin. This camera used the light from outside to create an image on to a surface, for example a wall or some kind of screen. Its very simple and has an extremely basic function to it. It takes some rays of light that gets into a small hole in a wall or a box. The rays then creates an inverted image that is both backwards and up side down. It’s the absolutely first version of projecting a picture, and it is still found in the cameras today.

The next camera made it possible to save and transport the taken picture. This was not possible with the Camera Obscura, but Nicéphore Niépce made a smaller camera that could save the image. He took a paper covered with silver chloride, which darkened when it was exposed to light. This made the image stay, but after a while the whole picture became black since all the silver chloride was still on the paper and continued to blacken.

Later on, Niépce’s partner continued the evolution. He made the former technique a little better by making the picture more enduring by using other materials. He managed to get the technique a bit further, and Henry Fox Talbot perfected it even more a few years after. This time ht user could adjust the focus with an extra box behind the original box. It was a manual way to take a picture, with taking caps on and off, and waiting a few minutes for the light to imprint the plate.

Next in the evolution came dry plates, which made the photographing even better and easier. After this the tripod was no longer needed, since the cameras was small enough to carry by hand. This was also when detective cameras started being a thing, and cameras was made as hats and other things, because it was so small. The evolution took another large step in the right direction, and soon Kodak would come along and make their famous cameras. The 35 mm film was right behind Kodak and soon the cameras was a lot like the ones we use today.

I wonder what is next when it comes to cameras. We already got action cameras that are small, tough and takes decent pictures. Well, I guess it’s up to future to decide what is next.